allons-ydraco

monanotlisa:

septembriseur:

As if anyone could really forget the most quoted line in “The Avengers” — “I’ve got red in my ledger; I’d like to wipe it out” — it helps to have that line fresh in your mind when deconstructing what Widow does in the final act of what’s billed as a Captain America movie. Black Widow doesn’t wipe out the red in her ledger. No, she blasts her ledger out to the world, like it was the grisliest email forward of all time. We know from her heart to heart with Hawkeye that the shame she feels about what she’s done is real, and she hesitates when she realizes that taking down the bad guys means revealing her secrets. But she does it anyway, because she’s not just a spy anymore; she’s a super hero, and she makes a super hero’s sacrifice. (x)

I can’t help thinking also that such a major theme of this movie is secrecy: how dangerous it is to do things in the dark, because if you don’t have to confess to what you’re doing, you never really have to own it. You don’t have to own your acts, or the consequences of your acts. No one can hold you responsible. In Natasha’s case, shining a light into the dark exposes both the secret things that she’s done and the secret things that have been done to her— most of which are intimately connected. To expose herself means exposing herself both as perpetrator and victim, not only as someone who has done terrible things, but also as someone who has been vulnerable in terrible ways. For Natasha, that is a very major sacrifice. But at the same time, it’s an act of strength: a statement that she is strong enough, and enough at peace, to own herself, to contain her history. 

That, to me, is an arc of the movie that’s almost unspoken: from Natasha’s devotion to Fury, which hints at a past in which he has helped her grow towards that peace, to her interactions with Steve, which seem like a kind of self-test: if this person, this fundamentally decent and loving person, can trust her, then maybe…? And this is the climax of that arc, the point at which she herself has to judge whether she is someone who can be seen without shame. Someone who can stand up under that scrutiny. And she does. And that takes unbelievable courage.

sapienta-et-doctrina

lotolle:

typette:

doujinsushi:

when I was younger I used to watch Winnie the Pooh all the time and everytime I saw pooh eating honey I was always like “mmmm that looks good” so imagine my disappointment when I saw honey for the first time. Pooh is eating like nacho cheese lookin honey he had me excited for nothing

no, bro. Pooh is eating raw, unpasteurized honey. Like this:

image

godlike

Oh my God. I’ve literally thought this my entire life. 

sapienta-et-doctrina

nadiaoxford:

cannonbarrage:

nadiaoxford:

I submit the intro for Hunchback of Notre Dame beats Circle of Life raw.

Especially since the former doesn’t have flocks of pink birds that immediately make me think, “Sure, Disney, you weren’t influenced at all by Osamu Tezuka. Tell us another one.”

This movie was surprisingly hardcore for a Disney retelling of Victor Hugo’s really screwed up story.

It also did a ton of great stuff with God and religion and Catholicism that somehow managed to still be about people and not bring “Why Religion Sucks” into the whole thing, which is aces.

One thing that surprises me is how well the animation has aged. Strangely enough, it looked weird at the time; we weren’t really used to traditional animation blended with computer backgrounds. But now that pretty much everything is computer animated, you can really appreciate how effin’ gorgeous the Cathedral backgrounds are.

Also, God Help the Outcasts is the most honest song featured in a Disney movie. “Honest” meaning it doesn’t feel manufactured specifically to be played in a suburbanite van ferrying kids to McDonalds. It’s raw, open, and genuine.

(Needless to say, there is nothing suburban about Hellfire, ho ho ho. Will we ever again see a Disney villain essentially sing, “Help me Mary, I have an unholy erection?”)